CIHT Planning for Walking - Long Version - April 2015


4 June 2015, 13878KB

CIHT Planning for Walking - Long Version - April 2015
1. Introduction
2. Walking characteristics, behaviour and trends
2.1 How much do people walk?
2.2 Why do people walk?
2.3 Variations by age and gender
2.4 Many find it difficult to walk
3. Benefits of walking
3.1 Health
3.2 Economic benefits
3.3 Relieving public transport
3.4 Walking improves air quality
4. Current conditions and challenges
4.1 Problems faced by pedestrians
4.2 Road safety and fear of traffic
4.3 Street crime
4.4 Barriers to movement, including main roads, railways and canals
5. Legal and regulatory context for walking
5.1 Definitions
5.2 Rights of pedestrians
5.3 Highways Act 1980
5.4 Disability discrimination
5.5 Active Travel (Wales) Act 2013
6. Developing strategies and plans for walking
6.1 Delivering walking schemes
6.2 Pedestrian networks
6.3 Land use planning for pedestrians
6.4 Pedestrian catchments
6.5 Improving pedestrian safety
6.6 Giving pedestrians priority
6.7 Developing more balanced streets
6.8 Transport terminals
6.9 Wayfinding
7. Promoting walking
8. Looking to the future
8.1 Sustainability
8.2 Residential densities
8.3 Planning for more elderly and elderly disabled pedestrians
8.4. Rising concern about health and physical exercise
8.5 Section 106 Agreements and Community Infrastructure Levy:
Funds for street improvements
8.6 Streets as spaces for multiple activities rather than just corridors for movement
8.7 Navigation on foot by smart phones and other digital aids
8.8 Autonomous vehicles
9. References
10. Bibliography


You will need Adobe Reader to view the document, if you dont have it you can download it here.